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  • in reply to: Amplifiers #1276

    mhattem
    Participant

    Grez, I understand that perception. You’re not going to get modern rock, country, or metal tones out of it, for sure. But notice that pretty much all of those tones I mentioned are from the period of the original model of the amp. Within that time period of late 40s to mid-50s, there are a number of different tones you can get out of it depending mostly on your guitar/pickups (and also on your willingness to use a few pedals like the transparent OD or delay pedal for rockabilly). And admittedly when I say “different” I mean what others might see as very small difference or none at all (e.g., the difference between early T-Bone and, say, Danny Cedrone). Unless you only or primarily play the kind of music from that period, then, you’re right, it’s probably not going to be your only amp.

    in reply to: Amplifiers #1271

    mhattem
    Participant

    That’s me in the video with the Vintage 47 amp (excuse the playing). It’s the V47 version of 51-53 Supro Spectator, though with a 10″ ceramic speaker instead of the original 8″ field coil speaker (though he is apparently working on sourcing field coil speakers for future models). Someone asked about what was between the guitar and the amp. In the video, my 1950 ES-150 was going into a Danelectro “Transparent OD” pedal but with no gain added and the volume at unity. It has a tone control and I got it only to sometimes slightly brighten the tone (though I don’t remember if it was engaged in the video or not). Then it goes into a Vintage 47 Clean Boost pedal so I can push the tubes without the cops showing up (i.e., a loud 5 watts) and finally into a Boss Fender ’63 Reverb pedal.

    I wholeheartedly recommend them. That Spectator with a leather cover cost me under $700 (a far cry from the $2300 for the Moonshine). Between my ES-150, Epi Broadway, Epi Sheraton, and Squier Tele, I can get early swing tones, 40s and 50s T-Bone, Chicago tones, early BB King, and with my Epi Swingster and a delay pedal a really classic rockabilly tone. With the ES-150 it does excellent Danny Cedrone, Jimmy Rogers, and Pee Wee Crayton-type sounds. To non-obsessives like me (and the rest of you, I imagine), the amp might seem like a one-trick pony, but each of those tones above is its own distinct “trick” in my book.

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 2 months ago by  mhattem.
    • This reply was modified 3 years, 2 months ago by  mhattem.
    • This reply was modified 3 years, 2 months ago by  mhattem.
    in reply to: Introductions #1270

    mhattem
    Participant

    Hey all, a little late to the party but I am a 39-year old PhD student and Teaching Fellow in early American history. My earliest blues influences when I started playing were early Muddy Waters, Lightnin’ Hopkins, and Freddie King. For the last few years, I’ve had a serious T-Bone addiction that just will not quit. I love all kinds of American roots music (1920s jazz through late 60s country-rock) though my deepest love is for rhythm & blues (and “straight” blues) from the 40s and 50s. These days, I alternate my playing time between jump blues and solo electric blues and I hope to learn a lot here.

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