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  • Gretschman59
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    I would be up for something like that. I think it would be cool because you have so many different people on here from different places in the world. I would be curious about some of the history in places like Australia, and Europe outside of the British Invasion we all know about. Unfortunately I used up my best stories on Paul telling him about the “Whiskey Highway” and telling him about the music history around Jason’s and my area. I have some friends here that I could get to share some of their stories. One who’s dad played with the Grand Ole Opry and played with a who’s who of people like Chet Atkins and Bob Wills. His house was also a big recording and rehearsal spot so he has cool stories of these guys coming to the house to play for the day. This same friend also himself has played with a collection of people. My dad probably has some of his times playing with Arthur Smith, and his uncle that did session drumming in Nashville and played with some of the Grand Ole Opry guys and others when they came to play through North and South Carolina. I also have some connections to Mac Arnold and some others that played with the early Pioneers of electric blues. There is also quite a collection of people that will have good stories in Jason’s neck of the woods. I think it could be a cool idea.

    in reply to: The 13th Chord #2220

    Gretschman59
    Participant

    I am confused. I have never heard you say that you don’t use the 13 in jump blues to me, and where did you get that from. I have always used the 13 playing jump, and I know I didn’t create it. I stole that from all the artists we talk about. It is a big thing to do here out East. BB King stuff lived off of that. Duke Robillard is another. You hear it in Tiny, Bill, and a lot of those guys. Paul did it a lot playing with you and Kid. He definitely has the East Coast influence on him though. Like I said though, maybe I am missing something. I am confused where this train of thought is coming from.

    in reply to: Guitar stuff #2171

    Gretschman59
    Participant

    Tommy, you said that Kid doesn’t have anymore Vintage Guitars left in the story of the ES-140. Is the Harmony he always plays not Vintage, or does it belong to someone else?

    Dig the video. My favorite part is Kid hang on the wall behind you all while you play. LOL I wonder what would be the weirder feeling. Going into a place and seeing a painting of you on the wall, or seeing that you are “Bad Ass” enough as a guitar player for your picture to be hung next BB King.

    Swedish Pastry. Was George Shearing the composer of that? We were trying to figure that out because it has been done by everyone under the sun. George Shearing is who we were all thinking was the original composer.

    in reply to: Guitar stuff #2151

    Gretschman59
    Participant

    Thanks for that information. I will have to see what all I can dig up. I love searching and learning about new things. If I come across any cool things I will post.

    in reply to: Guitar stuff #2148

    Gretschman59
    Participant

    You are welcome. Those ES-140’s have a unique sound. They have a voicing that really lends it self well to finger pickers like a parlor acoustic. I think that is why I like them so much. I wish I could have gotten the one I came across, but I didn’t have the money at the time. It was $900 and some change them. Now most of the ones I see are $2000 and some change. I would be curious to know who made yours so I can see if can find one, or maybe one by another manufacturer. Here is another clip I found of a guy playing jazz on one in a music store.

    in reply to: Guitar stuff #2144

    Gretschman59
    Participant

    Very cool. I didn’t know anyone made copies of those guitars. I had the chance to play an original one from somewhere in the 50’s at a guitar show. It was cool. A lot of fun to play. I think you will enjoy it. Here is a clip from YouTube of a guy that plays an ES-140. He does the old school blues thing very well. Both the country style and the early Robert Lockwood when he was playing with guys like Little Walter and Sonnyboy Williamson II. Thought you might be interested in hearing what that kind of guitar can do.

    in reply to: String 'Em Up #2122

    Gretschman59
    Participant

    Tommy, you will have to tell me what you think of the 20 plain. I have always liked it the best on the big gauge strings. For me it gives the best of both worlds with the tonal balance and still being able to bend the 3rd for those rockin licks. Plus it intonates so much better on those old archtop bridges. I have been trying hip people on to this, so maybe if you like it and hop on board we can share with people what they have been missing.

    in reply to: Your thoughts about going live! #2080

    Gretschman59
    Participant

    The editing may take out a lot of the file size as well. A lot of un-needed filler occurs in a clinic. A lot of shooting the bull and other things. I have only seen the clinics with Paul and Junior but I know with questions, stories and other things, there were a lot of things that would get everything sidetracked off topic for a while at a time. You could edit a lot of that out and just leave the demonstrations, explaining/breakdowns, and the jamming on tunes and that would probably cut the running time in half. That could maybe be a solution to file size.

    in reply to: Talk to me about picks #2072

    Gretschman59
    Participant

    I came across this video of a guy reviewing some of the picks that were mentioned here like the V-Picks, Blue Chip, Red bear, JB, and Dunlop. He plays a little with each of them and gives his opinions. In the video he will show closeups of the picks, and with the JB, Blue Chip, and the Red Bear, that is the bevel I was talking about that the Dunlop Primetones have (if you buy the sculpted ones) and that my friend puts into his Clayton picks like Tommy has. You can get the Primetone picks in the same shape as the Blue Chip and Red Bear also. Price wise they are $6 for a three pack. Sound wise they sound like the V-Picks, just maybe a hair brighter. So the way the guy describes the JB and Blue Chip compared to the V-Pick, I would imagine the Primetone sounds very similar. I really like the Primetone picks. Hopefully this video will help.

    in reply to: Your thoughts about going live! #2071

    Gretschman59
    Participant

    Sounds like you have been doing your home work. I would like to know more about the format/editing issues with the streaming idea. See if I can maybe think of something on that end to help you out. It may be something you could send me and I possibly take care of it for you. Maybe I could edit it down for you and send it back to you to post. My end would all depend on the format it is sent in. Could always try a mock video in the format it would be in, that way we could see if it is possible.

    in reply to: Your thoughts about going live! #2069

    Gretschman59
    Participant

    The second thought on group lessons, that will effect streaming of clinics, is the time differences with people that that Steve Spooner brought up. This would effect the clinic streaming the most, I would think, because group lessons can just be split up into people by region. NC is 3 hours ahead of you, UK area depending on where is 8 hours ahead, and Australia, depending on where, is 17 hours ahead. This could make streaming of the clinics very difficult. A mid afternoon clinic for you is dinner/night time for me, late night in the UK, and the wee hours of the morning the next day in Australia.

    A thought on this live streaming that may be something, and could bring in extra money. You have to have cameras to capture the live feed, so you could record it and post it to sell also on your website. I think this would be helpful for two reasons. First is people would have a way to relive it and go back to see things they forgot. We all see something and think “man that was cool, I will have to remember that” and then later that day, or sometime, end up forgetting what it was. So that way people can have a copy and always go back to it. Plus if you are someone taking video on your phone it causes you to become disengaged form the experience and miss things. The second thing is it also lets some of us others to be able to par take in the knowledge of these people as well if your clinic takes place in the middle of the night for us, or we have some other conflict. You could make it where if you bought a clinic ticket, or a live feed, you would get this recording free along with it. Then if you didn’t do that and just wanted to purchase it, you could sell it to these people for half the price of the live stream or something. The free video to people that came to the clinic, or streamed it could be solved with something as simple as giving your e-mail when you register. Then you just send the file to them by e-mail. Just some thoughts. I do not have much experience with this so they could dumb ideas.

    in reply to: Your thoughts about going live! #2068

    Gretschman59
    Participant

    A thought on group lessons on the technical side of things. A lot of these groups chats, like Google Hangouts, if used you would need to find away to control the mics and who has the stage. What I mean, with Google Hangout as an example, is the default setting is when someone’s mic picks up a sound the camera switches to put them up front on everyone’s screen. So that is who they see. Now in a situation like a conference call where everyone is quite, except when someone chimes in with a question or something, this typically works fine. The problem you will run into with group guitar lessons with this set up is, as you show licks and ideas people are going to play them to try and figure them out on their guitars. So when the mics pick this up it will be constantly scrolling around, and get confused. I am sure there is a setting, or way, to give one person total control of when someone is allowed to be heard/seen by everyone. So you would just have to figure out a way to let people let you know about a question and then you can give the floor to them to ask it. Then you would be able to cut them off so you could answer, demo, or what not. Hopefully that all made sense. If you already know how to avoid this problem than please ignore. One more thought on groups lessons that would tie into streaming of clinics that I will chime in on in another post.

    in reply to: Talk to me about picks #2058

    Gretschman59
    Participant

    The D’Andrea Pro Plecs is what supposedly took the place of the of the Spectra Tommy refers to. I feel they are slightly different though because they are a different material. I really like the Pro Plecs. I just do not have many because they are hard to find in stores, and I have to order them online. I will say save your money and do not worry about the Blue Chip Picks and the Red Bear. The Dunlop Primetones and the V-Picks are just as nice. My only complaint on the Primetones is you can’t get them any bigger than 1.5mm because I really like a 2mm. The Blue Chip is a little brighter than the V-Picks to me though. Like Tommy’s story of the pick, to me it is not worth it if you lose a pick and have to freak out because you are out $50.

    The best pick I have played, and definitely impressed more than any of the Blue Chips and others is something a friend of mine does with his picks. I just do not have the free time to do it. I have a friend that is a mandolin player and he takes the Clayton Acetal pick that Tommy use, but buys it in the 2mm size, then reshapes and rebevels them. I think the Clayton provides the best jazzy/blues tone of all the picks, I just never cared for the tip and how they released. They make faster jazz runs a little awkward, and definitely not as easy as the V-Picks or D’Andrea’s that were mentioned. This is why my friend also did not like them because of the tremolo picking, but like me just loved the tone of them. After my friend reshapes his, they have that nice smooth bevel that just glides over the strings, like the others, but has a tone that surpasses the others. The best part is you are getting them by the dozen for $4, not the $5 a pick like V-Pick, or the $30 and up for the Red Bear and Blue Chip. You might even well be happy with the Clayton the way they are. The reshaping is easy to do, just a little time consuming. You just sand it down to shape with heavy grit sandpaper, then use very fine sand paper and wet sanding to make them super smooth. You almost have to sand them down if you want to change the tip shape because they are very durable. The pick does really reshape itself after playing like a lot of others do. Dunlop Tortex or Fender Celluloid for example.

    in reply to: New guitar! #2057

    Gretschman59
    Participant

    Well the original difference between the sunburst es-175 and the es-295 was the 295 had two pickups. At the time the 295 was made the 175 only came in one pickup, and the 295 was the only available in gold. The 295 was introduced in 52′. The 175D wasn’t introduced until 53’because of the request for dual pickups after the 295 was released. When they started to make the sunburst 295 the only difference was ornamentation. The 295 had the flowered pick guard and the wrap around bar trapeze tail piece. Outside that they are the same guitar construction wise.

    If you do not know the story of how the ES-295, and the Les Paul Gold Top came about you should look into it. Very heart warming story. I read it in a Les Paul Biography years ago, and Vintage Guitar recently featured the story again briefly in an article they did on the famous guitars of Scotty Moore and Elvis Presley. Everyone knows that the Les Paul came out in Gold because that is what he wanted, but most people think it is just because he just liked gold. They also do not realize that the ES-295 was his doing as well, and that both the Les Paul Gold Top and the ES-295 are the result of one man/incident in Les Paul’s life.

    in reply to: Most influential guitarists #2049

    Gretschman59
    Participant

    I think with SRV it is two things that make people dis on him. One is the clones everyone mentions. The other I think is people’s confusion that occurs when it comes to playing ability vs musicianship. Some people are known because they are phenomenal at the instrument they play, while others become know because they are extremely creative as artists. So a lot of times it is this persons creative style that draws people in and makes them like their playing, not their actual ability on the instrument. SRV was definitely a talent because he was an incredible guitar player and gifted singer. Musicianship side you can argue was lacking. He didn’t write much music, and what was written a large number of that could be argued as weak. So people will say, “I don’t think SRV was all that good because most everything he did was covers, or his songs weren’t that good.” That is a judgement on his musicianship not his ability. On the other hand you have someone like Jack White who is just so creative as a musician, and gets lumped into “Guitar God” status. This is people mistaking his musicianship for his actual ability, because there are far greater guitar players out there than Jack White. Is Junior Watson the best guitar player out of the West Coast like so many say. Probably not, but the man has some sick creative mojo going on.

    To me after a certain level people are just good and it is pointless to compare a Brad Paisley, to a Kenny Burrell, to a Brian Setzer, to a Joe Satriani. They are equal and it really comes down to who’s style you like better because they each chose a different path and approach to persue. SRV was a great talent and I feel all the clones that are still here are a good reflection of that. Same reason you can’t not hear someone quoting Junior Lockwood, Charlie Christian, or James Burton. The same reason Nocturne is able to sell so many pedals that are a recreation of Brian Setzer’s Space Echo set up. They were all just something special.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 187 total)